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Web and Spark AR for the More Conservative B2B Company

Nick Bonanno

Nick Bonanno

Nov 114min read
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Web and Spark AR for the More Conservative B2B Company

Web AR and Spark AR are two of the most popular Augmented Reality platforms available today. They offer businesses a convenient, fun way to promote their products and services. But what are the differences between these two platforms? And which one is better for specific contexts?

Spark AR for Conservative B2B Companies

Spark AR is a software developed by Facebook that allows creators to develop their own AR experiences that they can then upload and share these creations with the world. Users can find and play with these effects within the Facebook and Instagram apps, where the AR is experienced through the front and back camera of their phones. A three-dimensional effect is applied to the environment shown on their camera. Another way these AR experiences are found is by being shared by others. For example, a user might see an AR effect on their feed and decide to try it out. Or, they might stumble across an AR filter while browsing Instagram Stories.

While Spark AR is mostly used for personal, fun experiences, it can also be used for business purposes. For example, businesses can use Spark AR to promote their products or services. They can create an AR filter that showcases their product in a fun and interactive way. When users try out the filter, they will be exposed to the product. This can help increase brand awareness and even sales. For more conservative B2B companies this can be a great way to stand out from the competition and promote their products in a more personable and fun way.

Web AR for Conservative B2B Companies


Web AR is an augmented reality platform that can be used to create AR experiences that are accessible through a web browser. This means that anyone with a computer or smartphone can access these experiences without needing to download any apps. Web AR experiences can be anything from filters to games to 3D models.

Like Spark AR, businesses can use Web AR to promote their products or services. For example, they can create an AR filter that showcases their product in a fun and interactive way. , But, Web AR also has a wider range of possibilities than Spark AR. For example, businesses can use Web AR to create virtual vending machines, career fairs, or Santa's workshops. The sky is the limit with Web AR.

So, which platform is better for more conservative B2B companies? 

It really depends on the specific context. If the goal is to create a fun and personable experience that will help promote the product, then Web AR is the way to go. However, if the goal is simply to increase brand awareness, then Spark AR might be a better option. It really depends on the specific goals and objectives of the company. For example, a more conservative B2B company might want to use Spark AR to create a fun and interactive experience that will showcase its product to others in a way that is not too over-the-top. On the other hand, the same company can use Web AR to create a virtual career fair that allows users to learn more about the company and its products. It really depends on the specific context and what the company is hoping to achieve.

By utilizing Spark AR or Web AR, conservative B2B companies have the opportunity to stand out from the competition and promote their products in a more personable and fun way. These platforms offer businesses a convenient, fun way to promote their products and services. They can help increase brand awareness and even sales.

Nick Bonanno

Nick Bonanno

Founder & CEO

Nick started his 17+ year career in digital media, advertising and technology as a freelancer, developing small brochure websites, and implementing basic SEO strategies, mostly for friends that were starting companies. Fast forward to today, Nick is highly regarded as a leader in his space, having worked on both strategic initiatives as well as execution for brands such as ExxonMobil, Yum! Brands, Kentucky Fried Chicken, 7Eleven, and many more global brands. His passion lies in aligning strategy with organizational goals and interpreting the voice and vision of the client's brand through enhanced customer insight and data management.

When he isn't working on a fun new project, Nick keeps busy with his wife and two boys. He coaches his youngest son's soccer team, and volunteers for Operation Bliss and the Greater Dallas Veterans Foundation.

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